Proposed Legislation Clarifies That The Percentage Needed For Approval Of Bylaw Amendments Is Based On Owners “In Good Standing”

A bill pending in the Maryland General Assembly would make clear that all percentages for approval of amendments to bylaws be determined based on the number of owners “in good standing.”  Owners “in good standing” are those not more than 90 days delinquent as to the payments of assessments and other charges.   House Bill 556 would clarify Section 11-104(e)(6)(ii) of the Maryland Condominium Act, which provides that amendments to the bylaws require the approval of  at least 60% of the unit owners “in good standing.”  That provision also recognizes that approval of bylaw amendments may be based on “a lower percentage if required by the bylaws.”  It was unclear, however, in instances where  the bylaws permit a lower percentage, whether the percentage required is also be based on owners “in good standing;” or whether that limitation only applies when the approval of 60% or more is required.  The proposed legislation would make clear that, if there is a lower percentage required under the bylaws, the percentage of approval is also be based on the number of owners “in good standing.”  The bill would also amend Section 11B-116(c) of the Homeowner Association Act to clarify this same issue.

Proposed Legislation Would Require a Developer In Control of a Condominium To Hold At Least One Council Meeting Per Year

A bill filed in the Maryland General Assembly would require condominium developers to hold at least one meeting of the council of unit owners per year, and receive unit owner comment on the operation of the association.  House Bill 218 would amend Section 11-109 of the Maryland Condominium Act, which presently requires that a condominium’s “governing body shall convene at least one meeting each year at which the agenda is open to any matter relating to the condominium.”  The proposed legislation is intended to address those circumstances in which the developer maintains control the council as a result of still owning a majority of the units.  It would provide that the mandated open agenda meeting is to be called by “the governing body or the developer,” and would require that, at the meeting, “the unit owners have an opportunity to provide comment.”

Proposed Legislation Would Increase a Unit Owner’s Responsibility For The Condominium’s Insurance Deductible From $5,000 To $10,000

Legislation now pending in the Maryland General Assembly would double unit owner responsibility for the condominium’s insurance deductible when damage to components of the condominium originates from a unit.  Under current law as established in Section 11-114 of the Maryland Condominium Act, the council of unit owners is required to maintain insurance “[f]or property and casualty losses to the common elements and units, exclusive of improvements and betterments installed in the units by the unit owners other than the developer.”  An individual owner in whose unit the damage originates is responsible for the condominium’s insurance deductible up to a maximum of $5,000. Otherwise, the deductible remains a common expense.  The result is that condominium master policies must cover property damage to all of the condominium structure, including both the common elements and units as originally constructed and finished by the developer, with the unit owners providing individual insurance for their improvements and personal contents.  If damage originates in the unit, the owner is responsible for the insurance deductible up to a maximum of $5,000.  Under House Bill 108 and Senate Bill 175, the $5,000 limit on unit owner responsibility would be raised to $10,000.

Proposed Bill Would Prohibit Limitations On Disclosures Of Agreements To Unit Owners

Legislation now pending in the Maryland  House of Delegates would prohibit condominium boards from withholding legal agreements from unit owners, and would prevent developers from including provisions in the governing documents, sales contracts, or  settlement documents that bar disclosure to unit owners of settlement terms.  House Bill 30 would add new Subsection (c) to Section 11-109.1 of the Maryland Condominium Act, which addresses the requirements for closed door meetings of the board of directors, providing that “[n]othing in this section may be interpreted to, authorize the board to withhold or agree to withhold from the unit owners information about any legal agreement to which the board is a party.”  Additionally, the proposed law would amend Section 11-134.1 to provide that any provision in (1) the declaration, (2) the bylaws, (3) a contract for an initial sale from the developer, or(4) an agreement to settle a disputed claim, is unenforceable if it “[p]rohibits the disclosure to the unit owners of any term of an agreement to settle a disputed claim.”

Maryland House of Delegates Passes Bill To Raise Condo Unit Owner Responsibility for Insurance Deductible

By a vote of 139 – 0, the Maryland House of Delegates has passed legislation that would make condominium unit owners responsible for a larger amount of the insurance deductible when the condominium’s policy pays for damage from an issue that originates in the owner’s unit.  Under Section 11-114, a condominium must maintain property insurance on the entire property, including the common elements and the units, except for improvements and betterments installed in the units by the owners. Where damage originates from a component of a unit, the liability of the unit owner is limited to the insurance deductible under the condominium’s policy up to a maximum of $5,000.  HB 249 would double the unit owner responsibility to $10,000.  The bill also adds clarifying language with regard to damage that is a common expense.  The current law provides that any damage originating from the common elements is a common expense.  HB 249 provides that this also would include damage originating from “an event outside of the condominium units and the common elements.”  The bill now moves onto the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Proposed Bill In the Maryland General Assembly Would Increase Condominium Lien Priority

A bill introduced in the Maryland House of Delegates would increase the number of months of unpaid condominium assessments that have a priority over mortgages in the event of foreclosure.  HB 250 would amend Section 11-110(f) of the Maryland Condominium Act to provide that six months of unpaid assessments for common expenses have a priority over a first mortgage or first deed of trust. The current law provides that four months of unpaid assessments have priority.  The proposed law would also significantly expend the charges that can be included in the priority lien.  Under the existing provisions, the priority portion of a condominium’s lien may not include (1) interest; (2) costs of collection; (3) late charges; (4) fines; (5) attorney’s fees; (6) special assessments; and (7) any other costs or sums due under the declaration or bylaws, or as provided by any contract, law or court order.  HB 250 would entirely reverse this limitation, and provide that all seven of these items may be included in the portion of a condominium’s lien that has a priority.

The bill has been assigned to the Environmental and Transportation Committee, and will have its first hearing on February 12, 2019 at 1:00 pm.